Band Of Gypsies by Jimi Hendrix

The Jimi Hendrix Experience had disbanded. Late 1969 found Jimi Hendrix recording with bassist Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles. This configuration would only last for a short time. Mitch Mitchell would return and replace Miles as Hendrix’ drummer a few months before his death.

Band Of Gypsys was released in 1970 and rose to Number 5 on the national charts. It seems that Hendrix owed the Capitol label an album of new material to fulfill some sort of legal obligation. Hendrix, Cox and Miles recorded four concerts at the Fillmore East on December 31, 1969 and January 1, 1970. Hendrix pulled six songs from this series of performances to form his new album. Interestingly, he used two Buddy Miles compositions so as not to waste more of his own. Band Of Gypsys was the only live album released during Jimi Hendrix’ lifetime.

Band Of Gypsys contains one of the best live performances that Jimi Hendrix ever recorded. “Machine Gun,” which clocks in at over 12 minutes, was a political statement concerning Jimi Hendrix’ views about the Vietnam war. Hendrix would use a wah-wah guitar sound, fuzztones and all sorts of feedback to actually create the sounds of war. It is creative, exhilarating, exhausting and ultimately brilliant.

“Who Knows” finds Hendrix moving in a completely different direction. This song had a funky fell with an easy flowing solo by Hendrix. It was a song suited to Buddy Miles. Miles was a great drummer but he was more melodic and funky than Hendrix would need long term. The jazz foundation of Mitch Mitchell would ultimately be a better match for Hendrix but on this song everything would come together for both.

“Power Of Soul” and “Message To Love” would move at a slower pace and find Hendrix creating some of the most sophisticated lyrics of his career. This mellow Hendrix features some tasty and melodic guitar excursions. “Changes” is probably Buddy Miles best know song. Hendrix quickly slips into the original groove and makes a few controlled improvisations before returning to the melody. “We Gotta Live Together” is not presented in its entirety. A ten-minute version would surface after Hendrix’ death and is far superior to the five minute version presented here.

Jimi Hendrix was not pleased with the Band Of Gypsys album. He may have been too critical of himself as it contains some excellent live performances. It also shows what kind of guitar sounds that Hendrix could create outside the studio. In the last analysis, Band Of Gypsys presents an accurate picture of the live Hendrix just prior his death.

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