Beneath The Blood Moon By Jim Roberts And The Resonants

November 14, 2017

Jim Roberts has had two distinct periods to his music career, divided by 16 years as a police officer and raising a family. Before leaving the music scene he opened for such acts as Ricky Nelson, Della Reese, and Danny O’Keefe. He even made a television appearance on the Mike Douglas Show during the 1980’s.

Today he is firmly entrenched in the blues, who backed by his band The Resonants, has just released his new album Beneath The Blood Moon. He is an excellent slide guitar player but it is his expertise with a three-string cigar box guitar that defines his sound. It gives his sound a more primitive feel, which is an important part of his approach to the blues.

Roberts music is direct and hard-hitting. Songs such as “Dog Done Bit My Baby,” “Gold Train Fever,” “Dark Down The Delta,” and “The Hell Hounds Due” are all energetic excursions in the realm of the blues with some stops in Americana and roots rock.

Jim Roberts has re-invented himself as a first class bluesman. If you like your blues direct and at times raw, then Beneath The Blood Moon is an album for you.

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Blue Room By Jon Zeeman

September 6, 2017

Jon Zeeman is a guitarist who has a sound, that once you hear it, is instantly recognizable. He has just released his latest album titled Blue Room. It includes seven original tunes and thee cover songs.

He is basically a blues guitarist who fuses some rock elements into his approach. This is clearest on his interpretation of the Jimi Hendrix song “Still Rainin’ Still Dreamin’ on which he moves effortlessly though a number of styles.

While he has a backing band, the sound moves from sparse to full. This is especially the case when he plays his guitar off the keyboards. Also of note is the late Butch Trucks, whose drumming appears on two tracks, “All I Want Is You” and “Next To You.”

He is an excellent songwriter and is able to create melodic blues. “Talking ‘Bout My Baby,” “If I Could Make You Love Me,” and “Hold On” are good examples of his style. There is also a gritty cover of the Robert Johnson blues classic “Love In Vain,” which is just right for a small smoky bar late at night.

Joe Zeeman has produced a solid album of blues. It is worth a listen or two.


Snake Farm By Beth Garner

August 3, 2017

Beth Garner has returned with her new album Snake Farm. It is a tight seven track release with six original songs, plus the title song cover of “Snake Eyes” by Ray Wylie Hubbard.

Garner has a wonderfully soulful voice that provides a firm foundation for her blues sound. She is an adept traditional blues guitarist, who really shines when playing in a slide guitar style.

Recorded just about live in the studio, she rolls through a program of modern days electric blues that moves in a rock and roll direction at times. “Wish I Was” is a three chord jam-fest that proves the blues don’t have to be serious all the time. “Used To Be” is a shuffle-style song about aging. Her take on the title track returns the song to its gritty roots.

Garner is one of those musicians who is constantly on the road plying her chosen trade in small clubs coast to coast. In many ways, she represents the way the blues should be played and heard.


Enjoy It While You Can By The McKee Brothers

June 5, 2017

Lee Denis McKee (guitar) and Ralph McKee (bass) have surrounded themselves with a revolving group of talented musicians including keyboardist/composer Bobby West, vocalist Bob Schultz, drummer Jerome Edmondson, and a dozen more including an array of horn players. to create their release Enjoy It While You Can.

They are at their foundation a rock band but when the brass is highlighted and involved, they morph into a fusion of funky soul and blues. All the tracks range from four to seven minutes, which give them time to build, tell a musical story, and highlight some of the musicians.

Whether creating energetic original songs such as “A Little Bit Of Soul,” “Enjoy It While You Can,” and “One Of Us Gots Ta Go” or soul-dripping covers of Earl King’s “It All Went Down The Drain” and Dr. John’s “Qualified,” The McKee Brothers have managed to combine their versatile group of musicians into producing a cohesive and pleasing album of music.


A Fistful Of Gumption By Randy McAllister

April 12, 2017

I don’t know how many drummer/harmonica players there are out there, but if there is a list Randy McAllister has to rank near the top.

McAllister is a blues/roots musician with some country influences thrown in for good measure. His sound may not be the smoothest you have ever heard but he more than makes up for it with energy, his superb harp playing, and three decades of honing his craft.

“My Stride,” “Leave A Few Wrong Notes,” and “East Texas Scrapper” all feature his harmonica virtuosity and leave one wishing many of the other songs would feature it more.

He has always been a competent song-writer, who is able to tell stories through his music. “Band With The Beautiful Buss,” “The Oppressor,” and “C’mon Brothers And Sisters” take the listener for a ride through the mind and soul of a Texas musician. “Ride To Get Right” is his ode to Otis Redding and Earl King.

McAllister’s 14th album covers a lot of ground but with energy and passion. Fistful Of Gumption is music for the mind and soul.


A Force Of Nature By Sari Schorr

April 12, 2017

Every once in a while an album sneaks up on you. A Force Of Nature is the debut release by Sari Schorr and why she waited so long is a mystery.

Schorr is a recent inductee into the New York Blues Hall Of Fame has opened for the likes of Joe Louis Walker and Poppa Chubby. She possesses an excellent song-writing ability but it is the power of his voice that puts he above and beyond the norm.

On her own compositions, “Ain’t Got No Money,” “Ordinary Life,” “Cat And Mouse,” and “Demolition Man,” her voice booms, purrs, and commands attention. Her cover of Huddie Ledbetter’s “Black Betty” transfers it to a modern day masterpiece. She even brings new energy to the old Motown classic “Stop In The Name Of Love.”

Sari Schorr has been around for a while. Hopefully A Force of nature will bring her some overdue attention and commercial success.


Heal My Soul By Lex Grey

March 16, 2017

Number 1: The woman can sing. She is one of those vocalists who can squeeze every once of pathos, meaning, and emotion from a song.

Lex Grey and the Urban Pioneers  have just issued their sixth album titled Heal My Soul. They are known as an energetic and explosive live band who have toured relentlessly honing their craft. Grey’s tough-woman appeal help them present music that fuses rock and roll and the blues into an interesting mix.

She is backed by guitarist Vic Mix, violinist Kaia Updike, drummer John Holland, bassist Adam Price, and multi-instrumentalist Brian DeWan, who have developed into a tight and formidable band. They are fueled by the instrumental leads of Mix and Updike. It is Updike’s violin that gives the music an unusual sound at times as her ability to use it in a blues format is different and at times stunning.

Lex Grey and the Urban Pioneers are still very much a Brooklyn bar band. They are perfect for a smoky club late at night. In some ways they may be a little to authentic for huge mainstream success but Heal My Soul is a disc that needs to be played loud as it contains the essence of American rock and roll at its most basic and best.