(You’re My) Soul And Inspiration By The Righteous Brothers

February 27, 2017

After The Righteous Brothers hits stopped for the Phillies label; owner and producer Phil Specter sold their contract to MGM for one-million dollars. Spector’s loss was MGM’s gain.

Their first hit for the label was a Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann composition “(You’re My) Soul And Inspiration. It was a song they had abandoned once as being second-rate. It would become the biggest hit of the duo’s career.

“(You’re My) Soul And Inspiration” became the number one song in the United States, April 9, 1966, and there it remained for three weeks.


Ballad Of The Green Berets By S/Sgt Barry Sadler

February 9, 2017

During the 1960’s, there were dozens of famous anti-war and protest songs but very few patriotic songs.

Barry Sadler was a real Green Beret and on March 4, 1966, his “Ballad Of The Green Berets” topped the Billboard Hot 100 for the first of 5 weeks. It would become the number one single of the year.


These Boots Are Made For Walking By Nancy Sinatra

December 20, 2016

It didn’t hurt that you were the daughter of Frank Sinatra. And it really didn’t hurt that your father owned a record label.

Nancy Sinatra managed to create a career for herself that wasn’t dependent on her father, despite the advantages that it brought with it.

She managed to grab the brass ring twice during her career. The first was with “These Boots Are Made For Walking, which was one the early tough girl songs; “one day these boots are going to walk all over you.” For a week, beginning February 6, 1966, it topped the American music world.


Lightning Strikes By Lou Christie

November 22, 2016

Lou Christie had one of the best falsetto voices this side of Frankie Valli. He had the ability to hit notes that were well beyond the range of most singers.

Christie’s career lasted over a half-century but he only spent one week at the top of the Billboard Pop Chart. “Lightning Strikes” is pure 1960’s AM radio and on February 19, 1966, began its 7 day reign on top of the American music world.


My Love By Petula Clark

October 16, 2016

When “My Love” by Petula Clark topped the Billboard Hot 100 Pop Chart on February 5, 1966, for the first of two weeks, she became the first British female to have two number one hits.

She was not a flash in the pan. Her career began as a child singer during the second world war. It would be 22 years before she had her first American hit; “Downtown” in 1965. That song would be the first of 15 consecutive top 40 tunes.

Now in her 80’s, she is still performing.


We Can Work It Out By The Beatles

September 27, 2016

“We can Work It Our” topped the American Singles Chart for three weeks beginning January 8, 1966. In England, “We Can Work It Out” and its flip side “Day Tripper” shared the number one honor.

“We Can Work It Out” was a Paul McCartney composition and he provides the lead vocal. It was one of their last releases before their music would begin to undergo a creative transformation.


Sounds Of Silence By Simon & Garfunkel

September 6, 2016

“The Sounds Of Silence” was written by Paul Simon during 1963 and an acoustic version was  included on the Simon & Garfunkel debut album Wednesday Morning 3 AM. The album and the song quickly disappeared and Simon moved to England.

Enter producer Tom Wilson. He had the Byrds “Mr. Tambourine Man,” when he asked the musicians from Dylan’s “Like A Rolling Stone” session to stay in the studio to record a new electric backing for Simon & Garfunkel’s “Sounds Of Silence” vocals.

On January 1, 1966, Paul Simon received an amazing New Year’s gift, when he received a call informing him that “The Sounds Of Silence” was the number one song in the United States; a position it would hold for two weeks. It would introduce the duo and their music to the world.