Don’t Break The Heart That Loves You By Connie Francis

July 30, 2014

 

Concetta Rosa Maria Franconero—professional name Connie Francis—sold more records than any solo female singer during the 1950s and 1960s. She produced a number of perky, upbeat pop songs, including “Stupid Cupid” and “Lipstick On My Collar,” and a few soaring ballads, “Where The Boys Are” and “Follow The Boys.” But it was through her series of sad ballads that she gained the greatest fame.

“Don’t Break The Heart That Loves You” was symbolic of her group of angst-laden ballads. It was the story of a woman trying to understand why her lover was treating her so bad, and ends with her begging him to take her back. Released during early 1962, it reached the number one position on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 31, 1962 for one week. It also spent four weeks at the top of the Billboard Easy Listening Chart. It was her third and last number one hit.

She issued a fairly creative interpretation of the song (written by Benny Davis and Ted Murry). It featured her voice overdubbed into two-part harmonies. She then added a spoken bridge to connect the two parts of the song.

After the song’s success in the United States, Francis recorded versions in German, Italian, Spanish, and Japanese that would propel the song to becoming a worldwide hit. She has recorded her material in 15 different languages. (Margo Smith would take the song to the top of the Country Chart during the late 1970s but would substitute a saxophone solo for the spoken bridge, which made it a little less maudlin.)

While she would continue to issue a number of hit singles and albums, as the 1960s progressed and musical tastes changed, her commercial success began to wane. Despite a number of tragedies and personal issues, she continues to tour and perform and is a regular on the Las Vegas circuit.

When performing on stage, Connie Francis has a vast catalogue of hits to draw from. One of the biggest was “Don’t Break The Heart That Loves You,” which topped the music world for seven days 52 years ago.

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My Heart Has A Mind Of Its Own by Connie Francis

June 15, 2014

 

Concetta Rosa Maria Franconero, better known by her professional name Connie Francis, was one of the most successful female singers of the fifties and sixties placing 59 songs on the American singles chart between 1957 and 1969. Fifty years ago this week her second of three number one hits, “My Heart Has A Mind Of Its Own,” was the number one song in The United States, September 26, 1960 for two weeks.

Oddly, it is some of her non number one releases that remain her signature songs. “Who’s Sorry Now,” “Lipstick On Your Collar,” “Where The Boys Are,” and “Stupid Cupid” are all nice slices of a pop world long gone.

Connie Francis’ formula was to switch back and forth between emotional and agonizing songs of love’s yearnings and catchy tunes with somewhat inane but ultimately mesmerizing lyrics that would stay in your mind for days, which was an important component for success in the days of early sixties AM singles radio.

“My Heart has A Mind Of Its Own” certainly falls into the sappy emotional category but it does stay with you. While her career faded with the advent of the seventies, her catalogue had withstood the test of time better than many of her contemporaries.

Despite personal problems and four short marriages she has continued to perform and record down to the present day. She has also become a fixture in Vegas.

Very few performers have had the commercial success of Connie Francis and a half century ago this week she ruled the American singles charts.


Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool by Connie Francis

June 7, 2014

Connie Francis’ career was not going well. Ten consecutive singles had failed to chart and after one last recording session, it was off to college leaving the music business behind. She reached back to 1923 for “Who’s Sorry Now” and before you knew it, she had a huge hit single , which peaked at number four on the Billboard Hot 100 in early 1958. She almost reached the top of the charts in early 1959 when “My Happiness” spent two weeks at number two

It was not until 1960 that she had her first of three number one singles. “Everybody’s Somebody’s Fool toped the Hot 100 for two weeks beginning June27, 1960.

New York University’s loss was American Music’s gain as she placed a total of 57 songs on the Hot 100, 1958-1969.


Follow The Boys 45 by Connie Francis

August 3, 2012

While Connie Francis remains a somewhat forgotten figure today, she was one of the most, if not the most, successful female artist of her era. She placed 56 singles on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart, 1957-1969.

She also starred in a number of movies aimed at the teen audiance. While the films were forgettable, they did provide fertile territory for her music.

“Follow The Boys,” from the movie of the same name, was issued as a single during February of 1963 and peaked at number 17 on the BILLBOARD Pop Chart. It was another booming up-tempo ballad that fit her voice well.

While her career has had a number of ups and downs during the last 40 years, she has left behind one of the better catalogues of hit singles of the early rock ‘n’ roll era.


Don’t Break The Heart That Loves You by Connie Francis

June 6, 2012

Concetta Rosa Maria Franconero—professional name Connie Francis—sold more records than any solo female singer during the 1950s and 1960s. She produced a number of perky, upbeat pop songs, including “Stupid Cupid” and “Lipstick On My Collar,” and a few soaring ballads, “Where The Boys Are” and “Follow The Boys.” But it was through her series of sad ballads that she gained the greatest fame.

“Don’t Break The Heart That Loves You” was symbolic of her group of angst-laden ballads. It was the story of a woman trying to understand why her lover was treating her so bad, and ends with her begging him to take her back. Released during early 1962, it reached the number one position on the Billboard Hot 100 chart on March 31, 1962. It also spent four weeks at the top of the Billboard Easy Listening Chart. It was her third and last number one hit.

She issued a fairly creative interpretation of the song (written by Benny Davis and Ted Murry). It featured her voice overdubbed into two-part harmonies. She then added a spoken bridge to connect the two parts of the song.

After the song’s success in the United States, Francis recorded versions in German, Italian, Spanish, and Japanese that would propel the song to becoming a worldwide hit. She has recorded her material in 15 different languages. (Margo Smith would take the song to the top of the Country Chart during the late 1970s but would substitute a saxophone solo for the spoken bridge, which made it a little less maudlin.)

While she would continue to issue a number of hit singles and albums, as the 1960s progressed and musical tastes changed, her commercial success began to wane. Despite a number of tragedies and personal issues, she continues to tour and perform and is a regular on the Las Vegas circuit.

When performing on stage, Connie Francis has a vast catalogue of hits to draw from. One of the biggest was “Don’t Break The Heart That Loves You,” which topped the music world for seven days 50 years ago this year.


Where The Boys Are by Connie Francis

January 1, 2012

Conie Franis is somewhat forgotten today but during the late 1950s and early 1960s she was one of the most sucessful female artists in the music indusry. She charted dozens of singles and sold millions of albums.

She also branched out into films as her career progressed. WHERE THE BOYS ARE was a movie aimed at teenagers. While the movie was far from an Oscar contender, her performance of the title song became a big hit.

“Where The Bous Are” was released during 1961 and reached number four on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart. This Sedaka-Greenfield composition was turned into a soaring mid-tempo ballad by Francis. It remains one of her more enjoyable singles.