Tell Me (You’re Coming Back) 45 by The Rolling Stones

October 28, 2012

The Rolling Stones had formed as a raw rhythm & blues/rock band. Their first United States chart single. “Not Fade Away,” reached number 48 on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart during the early summer of 1964. Their follow-up single in the USA, “Tell Me (You’re Coming Back)’ peaked at number 24 during the summer of 1964.

It was the first Jagger/Richards composition to be released as the A side of a single. It was still a fairly raw sound but contained elements of their rock sound for which they would become famous. It was also a very early ballad and more would follow as the years passed.

Today it remains notable as the first Stones single to crack the top 40 in the United States.

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Miss You 45 by The Rolling Stones

March 17, 2012

Another of the Stones songs from their funk/disco period that took them away from their rock roots. It proved to he a huge hit reaching number one on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart in the United States.

The song was not as tight as many of the Rolling Stones songs as Mick Jagger and keyboardist Billy Preston added a jam like quality to it.

ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE placed the song at number 498 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time. I still don’t get it.


Hot Stuff 45 by The Rolling Stones

March 15, 2012

I reluctantly accepted The Rolling Stones when they travel in a funky direction but the Rolling Stones and disco is just to much.

“Hit Stuff” was released during the summer of 1976 and stalled at number 49 on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart in the United States.

Harvey Mandel (of Canned Heat) was under consideration to replace the departed Mick Taylor on guitar and plays the lead guitar part. It wasn’t enough as the pernanent position went to Ron Wood.


She’s So Cold 45 by The Rolling Stones

March 6, 2012

“She’s So Cold” was the second single release from the Rolling Stones EMOTIONAL RESCUE album. It is a single that has aged well as I probably would have ranked it a star lower at the time of its release.

It was a rock song that may have been a bit repetitive lyrically but it had a rock foundation, which was very welcome as the Stones funky/disco period was finally coming to an end.

The single was a success in the Unite States, reaching number 28 on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart.


Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) 45 by The Rolling Stones

March 1, 2012

“Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)” was the fourth single pulled from The Rolling Stones GOAT’S HEAD SOUP album. It reached number 15 on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart in the United States.

The Rolling Stones went in a different direction with this track as it got a little funky in places. Both Billy Preston on clavinet and Mick Jagger on lead guitar used a wah-wah-peddle to influence the sound.

The lyrics were very dark as they told the New York City story of a young boy shot by mistake and a ten year old girl dying of a drug overdose.

It is one of those songs where the lyrics are much darker than the music.


Happy 45 by The Rolling Stones

March 1, 2012

“Happy” may have been written by Mick Jagger and Keith Richards but it was a Keith Richards project all the way. He played bass, guitar, and provided the lead vocal. It remains one of his signature songs.

It was an odd track in that producer Jimmy Miller played the drums and Jagger played some guitar and added background vocals. A rare mixture for a Rolling Stones song.

The single was a moderate succes in the United States as it reached number 22 on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart.


Wild Horses 45 by The Rolling Stones

February 29, 2012

An under rated song and single by The Rolling Stones.

The highlight of “Wild Horses” for me has always been the Keith Richards electric guitar/ Mick Taylor acoustic guitar interplay. Taylor was the perfect foil for Richards and tended to bring out the best in him.

It was a moderate hit in the United States reaching number 28 on the BILLBOARD MAGAZINE Pop Singles Chart. ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE named it as one of the 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time.

If you want to hear a different version check out Gram Parsons’ Flying Burrito Brothers.